Post 5: Interview

  1. What do you know about asylum seekers and refugees in Australia?

Australian politicians claim that our country is generous to refugees and asylum seekers, but looking at statistics and inside stories featured on the media, I believe this to be a falsehood. Refugees and such are sent to detention centres offshore on Nauru and Manus Island; they supposedly live in horribly decrepit conditions for an indefinite period of time all due to Australia’s controversial policies surrounding this matter.

  1. Did you notice any difference of the treatments on refugees and asylum seekers between Australia and Europe?

Europe appears to be much less tough on policies regarding refugees and asylum seekers compared to Australia. Processing and moving around refugees into the various countries in Europe sees to a lot more progress in the eyes of many.

  1. Have you heard of any reports about how refugees and asylum seekers were treated in detention centres?

Media outlets and organisations such as amnesty have reported on the deplorable conditions of these detention centres (particularly Nauru) where standard human rights have been completely sidelined. Reportedly, the condition of Nauru is repressive, inhumane, cruel and inappropriate – refugees and asylum seekers live in conditions that are not suitable even for cattle.

  1. Do  you think it’s a good idea that Australia is accepting more refugees and asylum seekers? If not, why?

It is definitely not a good idea for Australia to accept more refugees and asylum seekers while these current policies are still in place. Bringing in more people will only overpopulate the already overpopulated capacity of these facilities and detention centres. The sore lack of progress on refugee processing, undermined health treatment and lack of legal services and basic human rights will only worsen the refugee situation in Australia.

  1. What do you think the government should act when facing asylum seekers crisis in Australia?

Do not send any more refugees into the Nauru detention centre – it holds no purpose. Process the refugees and asylum seekers who have been waiting; bring them into Australia. Take example of other countries whom have been more successful in controlling the refugee situation.

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Post 10: Reflection and proposition

Reflection

Generating an idea can be fast but can be throw in the trash bin real quick. For me last week, I didn’t go to class with an idea because I was really struggling with this subject, the only thing I know is that I want to focus on women and children refugee on Nauru. But my tutor told me since Nauru will be closed down soon, I don’t have to focus mainly on Nauru, I can focus on Australia or around the world. But I didn’t want my design proposition got o wide, I want to narrow it down to just focus on Australia.

Telling my colleagues about my idea was hard because I didn’t have a proper idea with me, but with help from them, I started coming up with an idea of designing a web which shows the data of how often these women and children get sexually abused in Nauru. But they said I can push this further by doing more research as I didn’t thought of a solution yet, even though with my idea it can’t really solve the problem itself. But talking with my tutor really helped me with pushing my idea further, and the end of last week’s class, I thought of collecting data around Australia of how often women and children get sexually abused per second, minute, hour. I want to make this a really big issue for my target audience to gather together and help them.

Design Proposition

The issue I’m focusing on in the final design proposition is: women and children refugees often get sexually abused which affects their long term mental health. My final design proposition is going to be called ‘The Insiders’, it’s going to be a web based data collector which collects data of how often it gets reported of women and children refugees being sexually abused around detention centres and camps mainly in Australia.

With the facts of data collected from everywhere, my website will have a serious atmosphere where it sets the viewers in a very sad emotion. My target audience for this is aged 18-25 years old women who can put them selves in their shoes in order to think it as a very serious issue in today’s society. In order to prevent and/or reduce the number of women and children getting sexually abused in camps and detention centres around the world, I’m setting up a ‘sign up’ button for volunteers such as the ARV (Australian Refugee Volunteer) to go into the camps and detention centres to educate both women and men (but separately), by this both the refugees and volunteers get benefits from this system, and volunteers are able to get a certificate recognition when they complete this volunteer activity to add on their resume.

From this education activity, the possible change for this issue will be less sexually abuse from happening in a long period of time, women and children will have a better mental health after being educated how to protect them self from getting hurt and how to say ‘NO’ to them. By doing this, both of men and women even children will have a better life and better mental health.

Post 9: Visual documentation of the brainstorming session

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mindmap2.jpg

During the brainstorming session, it was a disaster to me. For my group, we started with who, when, what and why exercise. Because we didn’t know what our design responses are going to be, so we tried to help each other as much as we can. However as an individual, we couldn’t come up with any ideas therefore one of the tutor sat down with us and asked individually on what we are focusing at which actually helped us a lot.

I think the weakness for this exercise was that everyone in my group didn’t bring an clear idea of what they want to do, I think it’s because everyone are on their holiday mood since next week is review week so we can all relax, therefore we weren’t as concentrate as previous classes. However the strength for this exercise is we are a group, not as individuals, we helped each other a lot on generating ideas and coming up with a statement that each person wants to do. The whole tutorial time during that class was about generating a statement for my group and we were all very active, resulting everyone going home with their own statement so we can come up with a proper design response.

Angela Yu

Post 8: Brainstorming possibilities for a design response

Who: women and children on Nauru

What: bad living condition, sexually bused, mental health

When: 2013 – current, still happening

Where: Nauru

Why: inhumane, affects mental heath

Statement:

The problem is woman and children refugees on Nauru are being treated badly such as sexually abused and been forced living in bad environment which affects their mental health since 2013 to present.

I’m aiming at the equality and humanity for women and children in Nauru,  therefore my problem statement for a design response is woman and children refugees on Nauru are being treated badly such as sexually abused and been forced living in bad environment which affects their mental health since 2013 to present.

From my research, between Sept 2013 – Sept 2015, there had been 10 reports of sexual assault involved children in detention centre and May 2014 – Sept 2015, there had been 10 reports of sexual assault outside the centre but there was 82 allegations of physical abuse involving children during the same period.

Five point summary possibilities:

  1. Encourage young adults be more aware of this situation, not only happening in detention centres but around the world, teach them how to protect them selves when facing the same situation.
  2. Identify my target audience, who am i targeting at and what response do I want to hear from them.
  3. Focus on political responses, how is the government resolving the problem.
  4. Build a data base showing how often these poor women and children refugees get abused which affects their mental health.
  5. Raise the impact of this problem by strong illustrations and posters.

Angela Yu

Post 6: Data scraping

For data scraping exercise, I re-did a twitter search at home but somehow it didn’t work on my google doc which was disappointing. I followed the instructions but somehow I can’t get the data from twitter.

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Twitter is a social network which allows people to pose tweets with hashtags and other features, it’s similar to Instagram however Instagram is more like a daily photo based thing where as Twitter is a service that enables users to send and read short 140 characters messages called “tweets”. Registered users can read and post tweets, but those who are unregistered can only read them. Users access Twitter through the website interface, SMS or mobile device app. 

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However I tried advanced search on Twitter which have the same features as Twitter archiver in Google doc. I typed in #refugees #womenandchildrenrefugee #australiarefugee, with these hashtags I found lots of tweets from different people around the world, some are people’s perspectives on Australia refugee and some are news articles about refugee in Australia. I have to say Twitter advanced search is a really good search tool for us because it just shrinks our time and it’s so easy to access with one Twitter account.

With different tweets I found on Twitter using hashtags, I’ve found out women and children refugees not just in Australia, they often get sexually abused which affects their mental health over years, which is a big issue in today’s equal society. I’m thinking to focus on women and children refugee for my issue and maybe to think how I can prevent them from getting sexually abused by others, maybe this will be my main focus for my final design proposition.

5 point summary:

  1. useful
  2. easy access
  3. saves time
  4. truth worthy information
  5. understandable

Angela Yu

Post 7: Issue mapping

Over the last few weeks, we have produced a lot of different maps on the same issue with a group of people. With my group this week, we weren’t as productive as other groups, but we came up with a map of different stakeholders and their relationship with each other. The stakeholders we came up was from our researches on the issue and we were happy that we came up with this amount as we weren’t very productive.

This mind map exercise somehow relates my issue as I’m exploring around women and children refugees being sexually bused in camps. The stakeholders we came up with together showed their relationship to my issue and how they can help these poor refugees in different way but they are not helping. I think the media either public or private have a very big impact on this issue as they don’t speak the truth sometimes, and they make up facts about camps but sometimes they tell the truth which makes them not truth worthy. Organisations such as human right watch should go into the detention centre and educate women and children on how to protect themselves from being sexually assaulted. And the government should process the applications faster to reduce women and children’s rate on sexually abused.

I think creating a mind map together really helps with coming up ideas for individuals, as if I generated a map by my self, I would just sit there and do nothing coz I don’t know what to write down. But with a group of people, we can make things happen more effective and faster as we get ideas from different research which generate ideas for everyone in the group. post 7.jpg

POST 5: Approaches to design for change, design-led ethnography

My goal of setting this interview up is to learn how other people thinks of refugees in their perspective. I interviewed one of friend who is very interested in this topic.

Interview:

  1. What do you know about asylum seekers and refugees in Australia?

Australian politicians claim that our country is generous to refugees and asylum seekers, but looking at statistics and inside stories featured on the media, I believe this to be a falsehood. Refugees and such are sent to detention centres offshore on Nauru and Manus Island; they supposedly live in horribly decrepit conditions for an indefinite period of time all due to Australia’s controversial policies surrounding this matter.

  1. Did you notice any difference of the treatments on refugees and asylum seekers between Australia and Europe?

Europe appears to be much less tough on policies regarding refugees and asylum seekers compared to Australia. Processing and moving around refugees into the various countries in Europe sees to a lot more progress in the eyes of many.

  1. Have you heard of any reports about how refugees and asylum seekers were treated in detention centres?

Media outlets and organisations such as amnesty have reported on the deplorable conditions of these detention centres (particularly Nauru) where standard human rights have been completely sidelined. Reportedly, the condition of Nauru is repressive, inhumane, cruel and inappropriate – refugees and asylum seekers live in conditions that are not suitable even for cattle.

  1. Do  you think it’s a good idea that Australia is accepting more refugees and asylum seekers? If not, why?

It is definitely not a good idea for Australia to accept more refugees and asylum seekers while these current policies are still in place. Bringing in more people will only overpopulate the already overpopulated capacity of these facilities and detention centres. The sore lack of progress on refugee processing, undermined health treatment and lack of legal services and basic human rights will only worsen the refugee situation in Australia.

  1. What do you think the government should act when facing asylum seekers crisis in Australia?

Do not send any more refugees into the Nauru detention centre – it holds no purpose. Process the refugees and asylum seekers who have been waiting; bring them into Australia. Take example of other countries whom have been more successful in controlling the refugee situation.

3b: 10 images analysis

refugess1

A group of refugees protect themselves from the weather with emergency blankets as they huddle on the sea wall at the Saint Ludovic border crossing on the Mediterranean Sea between Vintimille, Italy, and Menton, France, June 14, 2015.

This image represents a group of refugees not giving up while waiting to cross the boarder on the Mediterranean Sea between Vintimille, Italy and Menton, France. Shows their desire of entering a new safe ‘home’ for them to stay even at that time there was a very bad weather forecast.

refugee-2

A Syrian refugee holds on to his children as he struggles to walk off a dinghy into Lesbos after crossing the Aegean Sea from Turkey

This image shows a Syrian refugee, probably the father who crosses in to Lesbos with two sons, one very young at a age of 1-2 and the other one on his shoulder at the age around 4-5 years old. It represents the desire from the father wanting his children to grow up in a better living condition, showing by his whole body inside the water but trying to have his children out of the water by holding them really high, and protects the elder son from drowning by giving him probably the only life jacket their family received on the boat, shows the love from a father to his children.

From the photo, it can be seen that no one is helping this poor father as other refugees runs for their life into a safer country before looking after others. A local man helps a Syrian refugee swimming exhaustedly from a dinghy to a Lesbos beach

refugee-3

A local man helps a Syrian refugee swimming exhaustedly from a dinghy to a Lesbos beach

This image shows a local man helping out a Syrian refugee onto the land after swam so far from Lesbos beach. Giving his hand out to a refugee means a lot to this poor guy who is exhausted from swimming a long way to get protected. By that, the refugee will get a sense of acceptance and a relief that he have reached a safe place.

refugee-4

Syrian refugees arrive on the shores of Lesbos in an inflatable boat from Turkey

This image shows the relief and happiness of finally reaching to Lesbos from Turkey, some of the refugees cannot stop smiling and some are very exhausted. There are more women then men on this boat with their children, most of them have life jacket on but there are still some without life jacket. Volunteer doctors and paramedics try to revive a baby on Lesbos after a boat carrying more than 200 people sank while crossing from Turkey.  According to the Greek Coast Guard, three bodies were recovered and 242 people were rescued.

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The volunteer doctors are trying to revive and calm this poor baby after the boat she arrived with sank, this baby seems very scared with tears in her eyes and feels painful from the facial expression. This image is very different to the text sources I have collected, because from the text I can’t really feel for them, but looking at this image I feel very pitiful for this poor baby who doesn’t deserve to be treated like this at a young age.

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A local resident cries as she holds the body of a dead baby in Petra village, Lesbos

The local resident feels pity for the baby as this little body shouldn’t have suffered so much, this image shows the unfairness this world have on refugees. The background of this image is Lesbos beach which indicated new refugees coming on to this land, meaning some dead some alive.

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A paramilitary police officer carries the lifeless body of Aylan Kurdi, 3, after a number of refugees died or were reported missing after boats carrying them to the Greek island of Kos capsized near the Turkish resort of Bodrum, Sept. 2, 2015. Aylan’s family embarked on the perilous boat journey only after their bid to move to Canada was rejected. The tides also washed up the bodies of Aylan’s mother, Rehan, and his 5-year-old brother, Galip. Only Aylan’s father, Abdullah, survived the tragedy.

This image was a very ‘famous’ image around lots of newspaper, this little angel died on the beach with an unique gesture, people around the globe feels very pity for this child. The government can’t do much about refugees arriving as they have to control the numbers on intakes.

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Refugees arrive in Lesbos after crossing from Turkey, Oct. 23, 2015. Many Syrian families with small children are currently forced to walk a distance longer than the Athens Marathon from the beaches where they land to the points of registration near the port capital of Mytilene.

This image shows the child shivering as she’s too cold and tired from a long distance travel. Her facial expression showed how scared she was and she didn’t have much thick clothing on as her living environment doesn’t allow her having a lot of clothes.

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People arrive in boats on the shores of Lesbos

Boats on shore covered with writings of SOS indicated how desperate these refugees were on the ocean,  trying to get protected. The child covered with a blanket siting on the edge of the boat feels hopeless and he doesn’t have a certain thing to look for, or maybe he is just too young to understand what is happening around him.

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A man throws his child in the air in celebration after they arrive safely in Lesbos from Turkey

With a life jacket been thrown in the ocean behind this man, indicates they’ve arrived safely in Lesbos. Throwing his child in the air indicated how happy he was.

References:

  1. Jean-pierre Amet / Reuters, Jun 14 2015, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed on 27th Aug 2016
  2. Yannis Behrakis / Reuters, Sept 24 2015, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed on 27th Aug 2016
  3. Yannis Behrakis / Reuters, Sept 17 2015, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed on 27th Aug 2016
  4. Achilleas Zavallis / AFP / Getty Images, Aug 23 2015, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed on 27th Aug 2016
  5. Giorgos Moutafis / Reuters, Oct 28 2015, < https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed 28th Aug 2016
  6. Santi Palacios / AP, Oct 30 2015, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed 28th Aug 2016
  7. AP, Sept 2 2015, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed 28th Aug 2016
  8. Aris Messinis / AFP / Getty Images, Oct 23 2016, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed on 28th Aug 2016
  9. Etienne De Malglaive / Getty Images, Nov 6 2015, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed 28th Aug 2016
  10. Pierre Crom / Getty Images, Sept 28 2016, <https://www.buzzfeed.com/lynzybilling/these-are-the-most-powerful-photographs-of-the-syrian-refuge?utm_term=.jrPkvVGXa#.arbE5mkV9> viewed 28

POST 3: Mapping the participants

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Over the four weeks of detailing studies on this issue, I have mapped out all the participants from my understanding which links to each other in different ways.

From what I wrote down on the map, I have to say this is a very complicated issue which involves several governments and organisations, which they all have the same ultimate goal with providing a safe place for refugees and asylum seekers to live in. However despite on the fact that the governments are providing a safe home for them, these innocent refugees and asylum seekers tends to always get abused in what we call detention centres, leading the media to reveal what really happened in these detention centres such as Nauru.

Media have a really powerful place in today’s society, people tends to believe what the media have said about a certain issue and starts to blame the governments. The first word I wrote on the map was ‘Australia’, coming up with words that relates to this issue then gradually expanded my researches larger to Europe which really helped with my understanding of the difference between these two countries. My aim for this issue is to discover the things behind this issue in a more global context by comparing two major places that refugees go asylum. By mapping out the issue really helped me with my expanded areas and thoughts about this issue.

Angela Yu

post 4:Identifying and collecting design example

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 10.15.34 PMHyperakt Labs collaborated with UNHCR (the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees)on ‘The Refugee Project’, UNHCR is an organisation which displays over 35 million refugee in 126 countries in one data base. Hyperakt Labs challenges to communicate and visualise UNHCR’s data in a meaningful way and at the same time to reveal the stories behind these numbers.

The approach provided by Hyperakt was creating a compelling narrative with a set of UNHCR’s 40 years refugee data. Hyperakt collaborated with technologist Ekene Ijeoma, they created an interactive experience that tells a story of where and when these refugees came from, as well as the complex history that involves social, political and economic influences.

I was overwhelmed by the numbers of refugees increasing years by years since the early 1970s automatically, it shows statistic about top 3 countries where refugees came from, and they are Syria, Afghanistan and Somalia, the top 3 countries where wars and persecutions occurred.

The design was so successful as it was exhibited around the world. It was selected for MoMA’s Design and Violence exibition, won the Designs of the Year 2015 at Design Museum in London, it  was featured as part of Mapmaker Manifesto installation at 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial and etc. The Refugee Project has hit nearly 1 million page views since their launching in January 2014, and was shared around social medias by global humanitarian organisations.

Reference:

Angela Yu

POST 2: Building your expertise using scholarly secondary sources

The two scholar articles I found discussed Australia’s treatment of refugee/asylum seeker children from the views of Australian paediatrician and European reaction to Australia’s refugee policy. Both authors supported their articles with sending out questionnaire web link to all Australian paediatricians and going through old papers of what the government has done in order to resolve the problem on the increased number of asylum seekers arriving in Australia.

In the first article “Australia’s treatment of refugee and asylum seeker children: the views of Australian paediatricians”, the authors E Corbett, H Gunasekera, A Haycock and D Isaac mainly focused on whether the refugees and asylum seekers in Australia know they are eligible of medicare or not. From the questions they sent out to the community paediatricians, it was indicated that 40% of Australia’s refugees were less than 20 years old and paediatricians need to know how to manage these children with their unique medical, cultural, social and linguistic characteristics. The conclusion of this article is Australian paediatricians considered there is a clear need for education about practical issues such as current health screening practices and medicare eligibility for refugee/asylum seekers and they are strongly disagreed with offshore processing because these young children get abused from the mandatory detention centres. The authors all have experience in medical, child health and refugee clinics and they have all posted articles in relevant issue. The authors position them selves with the refugee and asylum seekers and they think it’s more important to support medicare and health screening to those asylum seekers as there are a lot of young children under the age of 20.

However the second article I read is about European’s reactions to Australia’s refugee policy, the author Adrienne Millbank stated “there have been virtually no boat arrivals in Australia since the Tampa was turned away in late 2001.”, because we have a tougher border protection including patrolling the seas, excision of territory from the ‘migration are’ and offshore processing. By doing that, Australia have stopped many boats and they came up with a new policy which is mandatory detention if came in by unauthorised arrivals.

Comparing with European countries, between 2000 and 2003, there were over 300,000 applications for asylum were lodged in the UK. The highest numbers of boat people reached Australia during one year were 4,175, which is much lower comparing to European countries around the same year only because we have toughened our border security. By successfully reducing the numbers of refugees and asylum seekers coming into Australia, European started suggesting a new policy to mange their movements as well, and this new policy is offshore refugee resettlement program which Australia later on participated.

The author Adrienne Millbank thinks Australia’s policy is the best comparing to European’s policy as it increased the numbers of offshore processing in Australia.

Angela Yu

References:

Post 1: Creating a data set using secondary sources

refugeeIn the past decade, thousands of asylum seekers have made their way to Australia mainly because of war, civil unrest and persecution. Many have arrived by boats from Indonesia to Christmas Island as it’s the closest Australian territory to Indonesia. The boats are often overcrowded with babies to old seniors and obviously these boats are not safe.

“Australia is the second most generous participant in the United Nations resettlement program”, says Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. The first article I’ve read talked about out of 2 million refugees who seek protection each year, Australia takes in about 5000 people each year through this program. Refugees in most cases tends to fly somewhere close to their home country so they can easily return when the danger or threats ends in their country.

Australia doesn’t appear on top 10 or even top 30 of most generous countries list, but is currently having 35,000 people who are seeking protections and grants visa to 8000 of them each year which is still a pretty large number.

I would classify this piece of article trustworthy and well researched, as the authors Steven Glass is a board member of The Asylum Seekers Centre in Sydney and Eva Orner is an Academy and Emmy Award winning on filmmaker, Chasing Asylum was one of her award winning film. The authors’ position in this article is to increase our refugee intake to 50,000 per year which I don’t agree with her as we have to choose carefully of who to take in, or else we will just become the second Europe.

The second article I read was about how asylum seekers from Sri Lanka are reported selling their organs (kidney) in order to make their way to Australia as they have to pay for thousand dollar fee charged by people smugglers to secure access to Australia. The author of this article researched how militant group Islamic State is believed organising Syrian refugees to harvest their organs for being smuggled into Europe.

There’s no author’s name written on top or below of this article, and I believe its’s not a truth worthy article on the topic of refugee/asylum seeker, not only because there’s no author’s name, it’s because the sentences used in this article isn’t something seems they have researched about it before writing this article. Although they have a video in this article, it still seems to be a myth instead of a fact.

Yet a majority of people who seeks protections stated they don’t want to come to Australia because of the bad living conditions, they want to go to Europe and the United States. Refugees and asylum seekers detained on Nauru say they don’t want to come to Australia anymore after being treated very bad by the local government during the years they’ve spent there while getting processed. Although the President Baron Waqa said it’s not much to complain about when they don’t pay for utilities, rent and they even gets employed.

However in the third article I read, Debra Killable mentioned Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International gained access to the island in July reported with “the worst they’ve ever seen.”, as severe beatings, sexual assaults, harassment and robberies are a regular occasions. She’s in a position more lying to the asylum seekers and she made us felt guilty by saying ‘This is all happening right under Australia’s nose and taxpayer are letting it happen.’ The author is asking Australians to think whether they are indeed comfortable paying for this system of abuse and injustice as the citizens pays hundreds of million of dollars per year from their tax into Nauru, therefore we need to rethink if we are doing this in a right way.

This article is considered to be truth worth and well researched as the author have previously wrote about these kind of topics.

In another case, Australian government is turning back the refugee/asylum seeker boats without letting them into Australia, based on the claim of people on the boat are a threat to our country. However the Operations Sovereign Boarders is set to give a public hearing because our nation says we need to rethink whether they are a threat or not as if the Operations Sovereign Boarders are telling a lie.

Michael Slezak, the author of this article is indicating that the Australian government is hiding the truth from the citizens of why they are sending boats back when Australia have agreed to United Nation Resettlement Program. Just like the second article, Eva Orner and Steven Glass mentioned since Australia have assigned to the program, Australia may as well bring in 50,000 asylum seekers than 5000 per year. Which is something I don’t agree to, because even Australia have joined the program, it doesn’t mean that we can just intake more refugees than we can actually take, and these include our boarder security in this article have mentioned.

After researching in depth into the issue and analysing different aspects, I would like to investigate more on how refugees were actually treated when they are in detention centres, the difference of how European and Australian treats there refugees and refugees’ humanity.

Angela Yu