POST NINE: Collaborative Brainstorming

ANNABELLA GRIEVE

Collaborative brainstorming was a kick start to further considerations about our individual projects. At this point in the research process I found myself rather overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of researched that we had digested. It wasn’t immediately clear how this research should be transformed into a design response and brainstorming ideas as a group provided a start. Sometimes when overwhelmed with where to start it is easy to procrastinate and avoid making any progress. Hence, with the support of the group it was easier to begin this process. I would say this is one of the most significant strengths of the group brainstorming process.

Some other strengths were;

  • brain power. More minds at work to a problem are simply more able to generate ideas and create a starting point for further thought and development.
  • shifting focus. Thinking about someone else’s project shifts your focus from just one point of view, possibly sparking more ideas for your own project.

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Some of the weaknesses in our brainstorming were;

  • overlap. Many of the group members were dealing with a similar problem of societal stigma towards the homeless population and it was hence difficult to come up with new and exciting ideas as we shifted throughout the group.
  • note taking. Not all members collaborated on the butchers paper, instead writing their ideas in small, personal note books. I think this was a shame as butchers paper can be a great way to get even the silliest or most unrefined ideas onto paper. These ideas can then be quickly dismissed or actually be the gateway to something more exciting and concrete.
  • preparation. As we were somewhat thrown into this brainstorming process, it might have been effective to undergo two brainstorming processes. I.e. come back to the group with some initial ideas and workshop these further together or see if any more ideas could be generated from this process.